band merch pt.2 / Fractal Clothing

Slight delay on blog post! Turns out I’ve been receiving more promotion than usual thanks to my first batch of tshirts for LopoDrido. Received a bulk order last week for the band Vieja Estirpe. This one consisted of 12 tshirts in black and red with white ink.

ImageImage

Having finished this order, I received another one from LopoDrido: 20 tshirts all in black!

I’ve also kept busy these days planning out my first ever bazaar, in which I’ll unite different types of artists and vendors under one roof on November 5th. Things are slowly taking shape and I’m very excited about it!

Last but not least: the new Fractal shop is open. Still in its baby stage with very few products. You can check it out here: http://www.fractalclothing.etsy.com

band merch? Why not?!

I recently had the oportunity to make tshirts for the local punk band Lopo Drido, one of the first bands of its genre to emerge here in Puerto Rico ( circa 1990 ). Lopo Drido is one of the few oldschool bands who has kept playing despite their changes in lineup and a few years of hiatus.ย Rising from the grave, so to speak, they did their first show last night at the record release of the band Las Ardillas ( one of my favorites! ) and it was awesome.

Their merch consisted of pins, stickers and 20 tshirts in black and white.
Image

Image

Image

Interested in listening to their tunes? Check out these links:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PaXKyhQpZrs

https://www.facebook.com/lopodrido

And if you’d like to have some custom work done, I’m available for wholesale services. Email me at jennifer@samsaraprints.com or visit http://www.samsaraprints.com

Til next week!

basic 2-color prints

these ones are getting popular. I admit they’re my personal favorites aswell =]
Keep in mind I don’t own the proper equipment for multicolor printing, so these images have been printed with nothing but patience and a good eye *chuckle*

Below are some simple phone pictures of a few 2-color prints I’ve done.

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

working the weekend

Last week I wrote a few tips on how to work craft fairs and such. Well, last weekend I participated in one which is held weekly at the Melia Hotel and Resort here in Puerto Rico. Being a first timer at this particular bazaar, I made sure to have enough inventory for 2 days of work. With over $900 of merchandise I went last Friday, set up booth at 6pm and finished around 10pm. Saturday’s lasted longer, starting at 4pm.

Image

Image

One thing I learned about working bazaars at night: BRING YOUR OWN LIGHTS!
Since I knew we were going to be working at the lobby I didn’t think it necessary but boy was I wrong. Always come prepared with extras even if you won’t use them: illumination, power cables and extensions, your own table, a plastic sheet to put over your stuff in case it rains if you’re working outside, etc.

Image

Image

Image

It was an awesome experience considering I was also staying at the hotel with my family ๐Ÿ˜‰

Image

Image

See ya next week!

A quick How-To on selling at craft events & bazaars

I like to read the Etsy forums every now and then; surf through different threads, learn from my fellow etsians and even share my own ideas from time to time. One thing I see quite often are the threads regarding craft fairs, art shows, bazaars, etc.

Many etsians ask for advice on how to deal with being a first-timer at these events. What do I need? How do I handle promotion? etc etc.

IMAG1063

Preparing for events is a lot of work; especially if it’s your first time and you’re completely clueless! My first time was about 2 years ago and yes, I was less than prepared compared to right now. ย I have to admit that I’m still nowhere near an expert on this, but I’ve done quite a couple of events and have gathered a few tips which I’ll share with you โค

In my opinion, the most important part of these events is attracting your niche market. For example, my shop mainly attracts people between the ages of 18 – 30. My clients for the most part are into art, music, anything out of the ordinary, street art such a graffitti, etc. That’s part of my niche market.

IMAG0326

So, when I participate in these events I try to showcase my items in a way that’ll attract my niche market. I place art prints, stickers and promo cards on my table, I hang the coolest shirts right in front of the booth or depending where I’m selling. There was even one time when I hung my totes from a tree. YES! THAT HAPPENED!

IMG_20120701_144242

Apart from making your booth niche market-friendly, also pay attention to the possible future “not sure if I’m ready to buy just yet” customers. Many people are hesitant at first; they might see something that catches their eye but will tell you “I’ll come back later”. Others are far from your niche market; they may not even be a fan of your product, yet they’re right there in your booth. Give them a business card. Give them a treat, a freebie, a sample of your product. It all depends on what you sell. I like to give stickers for free sometimes. Some people get so curious over them that they ask to see more of my prints. One sticker can turn into a sale in matter of seconds. So do what you need to do to attract your market!

IMAG0475

Selling beauty products? Soap? Lotions? Give out samples.
Selling candles? Light ’em up! Attract buyers with your awesome scents. ๐Ÿ˜‰

Right after you catch their attention, your next step will be building a network. Make friends with your clients; give them your card. Ask for THEIR card. Who knows? You might need their services in the future. It won’t always be about making sales. In fact, you could end up with a great opportunity on your hands by simply networking instead of pressuring your visitors to buy. I had a woman visit my booth one time who did not want to buy anything from me. Instead, she just asked for my business card because she was the owner of a local pub and wanted some custom shirts made for her employees.

You never know who might show up. Stay friendly!

Make sure your business card includes social networks. It’s not all about phone numbers and emails anymore. Three of the most popular places used for networking are Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. Join them, update regularly, upload photos, promote your shop, link your accounts for cross-promotion. This means you can update your twitter and have it show up on Facebook aswell. Or upload a photo on Instagram and send it over to twitter, FB, tumblr, or any other network you have linked!

IMG_20120820_160636

As you keep working craft fairs and selling events you won’t only be doing business, but also creating a fan base for your shop, and these social platforms will help them keep up to date with you and your products.

IMG_20130808_210842[1]

So you have your products, your way of promoting, networking and setting up your booth. Make sure to bring snacks, water, petty cash, a portable card reader if you can, bags (eco-friendly is always a plus), sun lotion if you’re selling outdoors, and HAVE FUN!

DIY

One thing I’ve always appreciated and respected is the Do-It-Yourself culture. I remember being about 14 years old and not being able to afford certain things such as accesories or whatever trendy jewelry I wanted as a kid. Part of my family owned a local arts and crafts store where I worked and grew to love the art of crafting and DIY. As a result I made my own jewelry and accesories; proudly wearing them at school, making them for my close friends, and selling them on eBay using my mom’s account *chuckle*.

Now as an adult I appreciate what I learned then and what I know now! ย This is what keeps the mind running and the hands busy, plus there’s always something new to learn. The key is to research and keep an open mind. As a small business owner, the DIY process has helped me expand the shop little by little, learning new ways of promoting and spreading the word, reaching out to my target market and customers, etc. ย Once you figure out the best ways to stay resourceful, you can pretty much do anything!

IMG_20120506_203013

Many businesses skip this process and would rather let others do that work (which is perfectly okay too!). Many often feel the need to spend huge chunks of money on promotional items, branding, anything they can get their hands on that looks “professional”. Unfortunately in most cases that means one word: E X P E N S I V E. The fact of the matter is, we can do all of that on our own with the right resources and a good amount of motivation and patience.

Being the DIY junkie that I am ( 11 years and counting! ), I look for different ways to promote my business without spending too much money. This includes but not limited to:

  • Promotional flyers
  • Business cards
  • Brand labels
  • Hang Tags
  • Promotional stickers
  • Discount Coupons

IMAG2859

Making everything myself as opposed to ordering from a big company has its perks. I control all the production procedures, I choose my own materials, I make as many items as I want and when I want. Plus, it’s a great satisfaction to see my finished product doing its intended purpose, whether it be to decorate a garment or inform a potential customer.

Image

I realize that DIY is not for everyone. I get it! People are busy or have better things to do. Some business owners are parents or have other responsibilities which don’t leave time for all that extra work. Others may not be as open or confident enough to brand or promote on their own. And some people think: “Why should I do all the work? That’s what Office Max is for!”. Not hating, though. I love your paper selection, Max โค

So with that in mind, I leave you with this alternate option to DIY: support your fellow small businesses. Do you realize that, not only big companies can help you in your quest for branding and promoting your business? Many businesses that sell on Etsy (my preferred selling platform) help get you started. There’s a wide variety of shops which make business cards, tags, you name it. And guess what: it’s all handmade by them. So in reality you’re supporting the DIY community without having to DIY ๐Ÿ˜‰

Now on to the good stuff…

Last week I promised to give a lil info on my handmade stickers. Now, there are actually a few ways to make stickers. It’s all about budget and quality. If you want standard-looking stickers you could buy sticker paper from brands like Avery and print them out. You can also buy a small sticker machine from Xyron, which is basically the sticker adhesive with which you’ll make your stickers. You can use normal copy paper or any paper of your choice, print out your design, and then pass the paper through this machine and voila! You got stickers.


IMG_20120427_000344

You can also choose to “die-cut” them, which means cutting them in any shape you want. This is achieved by using an X-acto. Handle with care, folks ๐Ÿ˜‰

Now, there’s a more “street” way to make stickers, and it’s definitely the cheapest way. It’s also illegal, so I will refrain from naming a special type of label you can grab from your local…*ahem* office for free, gluing your soon-to-be sticker paper onto the label and peel the back of the label like an average sticker. Or if you’re an artist, draw on it! You didn’t hear this from me, though! Actually this is a common practice between street artists (and fun too!).

Most handmade stickers are not waterproof unless you use vinyl or a better type of paper. I have not tested this yet but laser printers MAY help with this problem. One thing you can do is purchase laminating paper. By laminating your handmade stickers you don’t only make them waterproof, but you can also make them glossy and better looking. Just make sure to laminate the edges aswell so water doesn’t reach the ink.

20130809_184119

Stay crafty, friends!

office space

Today’s post is dedicated to my little workspace/office. Here’s where I do all my promotion, brainstorming, bookkeeping, and general tasks online (blogging included)!Image

Some of the usual items seen around the workspace:

  • laptop – where the magic happens!
  • Samsara book – for all my book-keeping needs. Includes transactions, receipts, tracking information for all my orders, a task calendar, etc. I do my book-keeping by hand but also keep records on my laptop.
  • Task Calendar – to keep myself organized online, I made a calendar with daily tasks to do on different networks. For example: on Mondays I make treasuries on Etsy, renew listings, post on Instagram. Tuesdays are for Tumblr, Pinterest, promotion on etsy teams, and so forth. This is something I think all small businesses like mine should have. It’ll keep you sane, trust me! ๐Ÿ˜‰
  • Crafts – whatever I’m working on which requires extra space other than my screenprint room

ImageImage

Today’s crafts include: stickers and business cards โค

NEXT WEEK’S POST!

DIY stickers and promotional cards.

Have a great weekend everyone!